Human Genetics

, Volume 90, Issue 1–2, pp 126–130 | Cite as

Different chromosomal localization of two adenylyl cyclase genes expressed in human brain

  • D. Stengel
  • J. Parma
  • M. -H. Gannagé
  • N. Roeckel
  • M. -G. Mattei
  • R. Barouki
  • J. Hanoune
Original Investigations

Summary

Recently, we characterized a cDNA clone that encodes a human brain adenylyl cyclase (HBAC1). In the present study, we identified a second population of mRNA suspected to encode a new brain adenylyl cyclase (HBAC2). The amino acid sequence of HBAC2 displays significant homology with HBAC1 in the highly conserved adenylyl cyclase domain (250 aminio acids), found in the 3′ cytoplasmic domain of all mammalian adenylyl cyclases. However, outside this domain, the homology is extremely low, suggesting that the corresponding mRNA originates from a different gene. We report here the first chromosomal localization of the adenylyl cyclase genes determined by in situ hybridization of human metaphase chromosomal spreads using human brain cDNA probes specific for each mRNA. The probe corresponding to HBAC1 exhibited a strong specific signal on chromosome 8q24, with a major peak in the band q24.2. In contrast, the HBAC2 probe hybridized to chromosome 5p15, with a major peak in the band p15.3. The two cDNAs hybridized at the two loci without any cross reactivity. Thus, in human brain, a heterogeneous population of adenylyl cyclase mRNAs is expressed, and the corresponding genes might be under the control of independent regulatory mechanisms.

Abbreviations

C

catalytic part of adenylyl cyclase

BBAC

bovine brain

HBAC

human brain

ROAC

rat olfactory

RLAC

rat liver

RTAC

rat testis adenylyl cyclase

G

guanine nucleotide GTP binding protein (s, stimulatory; i, inhibitory)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Stengel
    • 1
  • J. Parma
    • 1
  • M. -H. Gannagé
    • 1
  • N. Roeckel
    • 2
  • M. -G. Mattei
    • 2
  • R. Barouki
    • 1
  • J. Hanoune
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale. U-99, Hôpital Henri MondorCréteilFrance
  2. 2.Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U-242, Hôpital des Enfants de la TimoneMarseille Cedex 5France

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