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Human Genetics

, Volume 90, Issue 1–2, pp 62–64 | Cite as

Detection of GST1 gene deletion by the polymerase chain reaction and its possible correlation with stomach cancer in Japanese

  • Shoji Harada
  • Shogo Misawa
  • Takako Nakamura
  • Naomi Tanaka
  • Ei Ueno
  • Mutsumi Nozoe
Original Investigations

Summary

A homozygous gene deletion at the GST1 locus of genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood was investigated for its relationship with several types of cancer using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. DNA samples were prepared from blood obtained from 128 healthy blood donors and 150 patients with cancer or chronic hepatitis. PCR primers were prepared based on the human cDNA sequence and the intron/exon sequences of the rat Yb2 gene. The amplified sequence between exons 5 and 6 including intron 5 showed very clearly the presence of absence of the GST1 gene, after electrophoresis in a 2% agarose gel. Segregation of the presence and absence of PCR product from samples of twins and their parents indicated that presence involves homozygous or heterozygous normal GST1 genotypes while absence invovles only homozygous gene deletion. The patients with stomach cancer had a significantly higher frequency of gene deletion than did the healthy controls (P< 0.005). Thus, GST1 deletion may be a possible genetic marker for early detection of a group at high risk of stomach cancer.

Keywords

Polymerase Chain Reaction Hepatitis Chronic Hepatitis Polymerase Chain Reaction Product cDNA Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shoji Harada
    • 1
  • Shogo Misawa
    • 1
  • Takako Nakamura
    • 1
  • Naomi Tanaka
    • 2
  • Ei Ueno
    • 2
  • Mutsumi Nozoe
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Community Medicine University of TsukubaTsukuba, IbarakiJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Clinical MedicineUniversity of TsukubaTsukuba, IbarakiJapan

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