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Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 219, Issue 3, pp 445–456 | Cite as

Immunohistochemical localization of polypeptide hormones in endocrine cells of the digestive tract of Branchiostoma lanceolatum

  • M. Reinecke
Article

Summary

The digestive tract of the cephalochordate Branchiostoma lanceolatum was investigated with regard to occurrence and distribution of endocrine cells. By the use of the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique, cells in the gut epithelium reacting with antisera against 8 different mammalian polypeptide hormones were localized. Positive reactions were obtained with antisera against the four mammalian islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin) and against secretin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pentagastrin and neurotensin. No immunoreactivity was found with antisera against members of the lipotropin family (ACTH, met-enkephalin, α-endorphin), against big-gastrin, cholecystokinin, substance P and moulin. The exact mapping of the different polypeptide immunoreactive cells throughout the digestive tract of Branchiostoma lanceolatum is presented.

Key words

Polypeptide hormones Digestive tract Branchiostoma lanceolatum Immunohistochemistry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Reinecke
    • 1
  1. 1.Anatomisches Institut IIIUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergFederal Republic of Germany

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