Human Genetics

, Volume 95, Issue 6, pp 709–711 | Cite as

Redefinition of the coding sequence of the MXI1 gene and identification of a polymorphic repeat in the 3′ non-coding region that allows the detection of loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 10q25 in glioblastomas

  • Ruth Albarosa
  • Stefano DiDonato
  • Gaetano Finocchiaro
Short Communication

Abstract

The MXI1 gene encodes a protein interacting with Max, a regulatory factor of the Myc oncogene, and is located on chromosome 10q25, a region showing frequent loss of heterozygosity in malignant gliomas. We have reassessed the coding sequence of MXI1 and found that, at the 3′ end, the open reading frame is 28 codons shorter than previously described. We have also found an AAAAC polymorphic repeat (two alleles, 45% heterozygosity) in the 3′ non-coding region of the gene. Six anaplastic astrocytomas and nine glioblastomas, the most malignant form of glioma, were informative for this polymorphism. Loss of heterozygosity was demonstrated in all glioblastomas, but not in the remaining tumors.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ayer DE, Kretzner L, Eisenman RN (1993) Mad: a heteromeric partner for Max that antagonizes Myc transcriptional activity. Cell 72:211–222Google Scholar
  2. Blackwell TK, Kretzner L, Blackwood EM, Eisenman RN, Weintraub H (1990) Sequence-specific DNA binding by the c-myc protein. Science 250:1149–1151Google Scholar
  3. Dang CV, McGuire M, Buckmire M, Lee WMF (1989) Involvement of the “leucine zipper” region in the oligomerization and transforming activity of human c-myc protein. Nature 337:664–666Google Scholar
  4. Edelhoff S, Ayer DE, Zervos AS, Steingrimsson E, Jenkins NA, Copeland NG, Eisenman RN, Brent R, Disteche CM (1994) Mapping of two genes encoding members of a distinct subfamily of MAX interacting proteins: MAD to human chromosome 2 and mouse chromosome 6, and MXI1 to human chromosome 10 and mouse chromosome 19. Oncogene 9:665–668Google Scholar
  5. Fults D, Pedone C (1993) Deletion mapping of the long arm of chromosome 10 in glioblastoma multiforme. Genes Chromosom Cancer 7:173–177Google Scholar
  6. Knudson AG Jr (1971) Mutation and cancer: statistical study in retinoblastoma. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 68:820–823Google Scholar
  7. Kretzner L, Blackwood EM, Eisenman RN (1992) The myc and max proteins possess distinct transcriptional activities. Nature 359:426–429Google Scholar
  8. Magnani I, Guerneri S, Pollo B, Cirenei N, Colombo BM, Broggi G, Galli C, Bugiani O, DiDonato S, Finocchiaro G, Fuhrman Conti AM (1994) Increasing complexity of the karyotype in 50 human gliomas — Progressive evolution and de novo occurrence of cytogenetic alterations. Cancer Genet Cytogenet 75:77–89Google Scholar
  9. Rasheed BKA, Fuller GN, Friedman AH, Bigner DD, Bigner SH (1992) Loss of heterozygosity for 10q loci in human gliomas. Genes Chromosom Cancer 5:75–82Google Scholar
  10. Zervos AS, Gyuris J, Brent R (1993) Mxi1, a protein that specifically interacts with Max to bind Myc-Max recognition sites. Cell 72:223–232Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Albarosa
    • 1
  • Stefano DiDonato
    • 1
  • Gaetano Finocchiaro
    • 1
  1. 1.Divisione di Biochimica e GeneticaIstituto Nazionale Neurologico “C. Besta”MilanoItaly

Personalised recommendations