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GeoJournal

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 299–312 | Cite as

Settlement patterns in Judea and Samaria

  • Grossman D. 
Article

Abstract

The settlement patterns of the West Bank (Judea and Samaria) reflect the physical and cultural makeup of the area. Physical factors are most important in conditioning the layout and size of settlements. The dominance of fairly uniform Arab population reduces, to some extent, the significance of the cultural factor for the purpose of differentiating patterns, but recent Jewish settlement has introduced distinct new forms. The patterns can also be related to the age of the settlement. This applies to the Arab communities and not only to the Jewish ones. It is shown that patterns can be identified and explained by the intersection of the time factor and a certain langscape factor. Nine different patterns (two Jewish, six Arab and one mixed) are identified and explained.

Keywords

Environmental Management Physical Factor Cultural Factor Time Factor Settlement Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grossman D. 
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geogr.Bar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael

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