Mycorrhiza

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 81–87 | Cite as

Ectomycorrhizal fungi of Kashmir forests

  • R. Watling
  • S. P. Abraham
Original Papers

Abstract

All the macromycetes recorded in Kashmir and suspected to be mycorrhizal (77 taxa) are discussed in the context of the vegetational communities of Kashmir.

Key words

Conifers Willows Birch Agarics Boletes Chanterelles Clavarioid fungi 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Watling
    • 1
  • S. P. Abraham
    • 2
  1. 1.Royal Botanic GardenEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Regional Research LaboratorySrinagarIndia

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