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Human Genetics

, Volume 90, Issue 6, pp 629–634 | Cite as

Prothymosin α gene in humans: organization of its promoter region and localization to chromosome 2

  • P. Szabo
  • C. Panneerselvam
  • M. Clinton
  • M. Frangou-Lazaridis
  • D. Weksler
  • E. Whittington
  • M. J. Macera
  • K.-H. Grzeschik
  • A. Selvakumar
  • B. L. Horecker
Original Investigations

Abstract

A genomic clone encoding prothymosin α (gene symbol: PTMA), a nuclear-targeted protein associated with cell proliferation, was isolated and the 5′-regulatory region subcloned and sequenced. Because of previously reported discrepancies between several cDNA clones and a genomic clone for prothymosin α, we determined the sequence of the first exon and of a 1.7-kb region 5′ to the first exon. The sequence of the genomic clone reported here corresponds to the published cDNA sequences, suggesting that the previously noted discrepancies may be due to genetic polymorphism in this region. In addition, our sequence data extend the known 5′-upstream sequence by an additional 1.5 kb allowing the identification of numerous, potential cis-acting regulatory sites. This 5′-flanking cloned probe permitted us to localize the protothymosin gene to chromosome 2 in humans.

Keywords

Cell Proliferation Internal Medicine Promoter Region Sequence Data Metabolic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Szabo
    • 1
  • C. Panneerselvam
    • 2
  • M. Clinton
    • 2
  • M. Frangou-Lazaridis
    • 2
  • D. Weksler
    • 1
  • E. Whittington
    • 1
  • M. J. Macera
    • 4
  • K.-H. Grzeschik
    • 5
  • A. Selvakumar
    • 3
  • B. L. Horecker
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of MedicineCornell University Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryCornell University Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Immunogenetics Laboratory, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of GeneticsLong Island College HospitalBrooklynUSA
  5. 5.Institut für Humangenetik, Klinikum der Philipps-Universität MarburgMarburgGermany

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