Advertisement

Trees

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 156–159 | Cite as

Hydraulic conductivity of branch junctions in three temperate tree species

  • Melvin T. Tyree
  • John D. Alexander
Original Articles

Summary

Hydraulic conductivities were measured in branch junctions and in the proximal segments of Quercus velutina Lam., Acer saccharum Marsh., and Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr. In all three species, the basal proximal segment was more conductive than the junction by a factor of 1.1–1.5. There was no consistent pattern for the distal proximal segments, where the conductivities were higher, lower, or the same as the junction. These data are discussed in terms of Martin H. Zimmermann's concept of plant segmentation. It is concluded that junction constrictions to water flow contribute less to plant segmentation than the variation in leaf specific conductivity in the crown of these species.

Key words

Hydraulic conductivity Stem insertions Quercus velutina Acer saccharum Tsuga canadensis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cochard H, Tyree MT (1990) Xylem dysfunction in Quercus: vessel size, tyloses, cavitation and seasonal changes in embolism. Tree Physiol 6: 393–407Google Scholar
  2. Ewers FW, Zimmermann MH (1984a) The hydraulic architecture of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis). Can J Bot 62: 940–946Google Scholar
  3. Ewers FW, Zimmermann MH (1984b) The hydraulic architecture of balsam fir (Abies balsamea). Physiol Plant 60: 453–458Google Scholar
  4. Ewers FW, Fisher JB, Chiu S-T (1989) Water transport in the liana Bauhinia fassoglensis (Fabaceae). Plant Physiol 91: 1625–1631Google Scholar
  5. Sperry JS, Donnelly JR, Tyree MT (1987) A method for measuring hydraulic conductivity and embolism in xylem. Plant Cell Environ 11: 35–40Google Scholar
  6. Tyree MT, Ewers FW (1991) The hydraulic architecture of trees and other woody plants. New Phytol 119: 345–360Google Scholar
  7. Tyree MT, Graham MED, Cooper KE, Bazos ML (1983) The hydraulic architecture of Thuja occidentales. Can J Bot 61: 2105–2111Google Scholar
  8. Zimmermann MH (1978) Hydraulic architecture of some diffuse-porous trees. Can J Bot 56: 2286–2295Google Scholar
  9. Zimmermann MH (1983) Xylem structure and the ascent of sap. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melvin T. Tyree
    • 1
  • John D. Alexander
    • 1
  1. 1.USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment StationBurlingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations