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Journal of Comparative Physiology A

, Volume 175, Issue 5, pp 597–610 | Cite as

Flight-correlated activity changes in neurons of the lateral accessory lobes in the brain of the locust Schistocerca gregaria

  • U. Homberg
Original Papers

Abstract

The study investigates activity changes in neurons of the lateral accessory lobes in the brain of the locust Schistocerca gregaria during wind-elicited tethered flight. Neurons with ascending projections from the ventral nerve cord to the lateral accessory lobes showed flight-associated excitations which were modulated in the flight motor rhythm. Descending neurons with ramifications in the lateral accessory lobes were tonically excited corresponding to flight duration. The onset of wind-elicited responses in the descending neurons preceded the onset of flight motor activity by 22–60 milliseconds. Neurons connecting the lateral accessory lobes with the central body, the anterior optic tubercles, or other brain areas showed a variety of responses including activity changes during flight initiation and flight termination. Activity in many of these neurons was less tightly coupled to the flight situation and often returned to background levels before flight was terminated. Most of the recorded neurons responded, in addition, to stationary visual stimuli. The results suggest that the lateral accessory lobes in the locust brain are integrative links between the central body, visual pathways, and the ventral nerve cord. The possible involvement of these brain areas in flight control is discussed.

Key words

Insect brain Flight control Lateral accessory lobe Locust Central body 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Homberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Zoologie, Universität RegensburgRegensburgGermany

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