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Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 69–76 | Cite as

Lysis of autologous tumor cells by blood lymphocytes tested at the time of surgery

Correlation with the postsurgical clinical course
  • Farkas Vánky
  • Eva Klein
  • Jan Willems
  • Kim Böök
  • Torbjörn Ivert
  • Arpád Péterffy
  • Ulf Nilsonne
  • Andris Kreicbergs
  • Tomas Aparisi
Original Articles

Summary

Lymphocyte-mediated lysis of autologous tumor cells (autologous lymphocyte cytotoxocity ALC) was tested at the time of surgery in 108 patients (46 squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, 25 adenocarcinomas of the lung, 19 soft tissue sarcomas and 18 osteosarcomas). The clinical course of these patients in relation to the test results has been published previously. The group was evaluated again after an extended observation time, now with a mean of 80.2 months (range 36–108). The test was rarely positive in patients with metastasis (2 out of 28 experiments).

There was a correlation between the ALC results and the postsurgical clinical course for patients without detectable metastasis in that (1) a negative test was invariably a bad prognostic sign, i.e., all 32 patients with negative ALC died within 3 years (mean survival time 16.1 months). (2) The remission and survival times were longer for the ALC positive patients (p<0.001). (3) All 37 individuals who are alive at present without recurrence belong to the reactive group.

The ALC results correlated with the clinical course in 88% of patients. The correlation was highest for the groups of soft tissue sarcoma and adenocarcinoma of the lung. There was no correlation between killing of K562 cells and ALC, or between lymphoproliferative response to PHA and ALC reactivity.

Keywords

Adenocarcinoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma Sarcoma Survival Time Osteosarcoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farkas Vánky
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eva Klein
    • 1
  • Jan Willems
    • 3
  • Kim Böök
    • 4
  • Torbjörn Ivert
    • 4
  • Arpád Péterffy
    • 4
  • Ulf Nilsonne
    • 5
  • Andris Kreicbergs
    • 5
  • Tomas Aparisi
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Tumor BiologyKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of RadiumhemmetKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Department of Radiumhemmet Tumor PathologyKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Department of Radiumhemmet Thoracic SurgeryKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  5. 5.Department of Radiumhemmet Orthopedic SurgeryKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden

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