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Journal of Molecular Medicine

, Volume 73, Issue 10, pp 515–520 | Cite as

Germ line mutations of hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes in Japanese families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC): usefulness of DNA analysis for screening and diagnosis of HNPCC patients

  • M. Miyaki
  • M. Konishi
  • M. Muraoka
  • R. Kikuchi-Yanoshita
  • K. Tanaka
  • T. Iwama
  • T. Mori
  • M. Koike
  • K. Ushio
  • M. Chiba
  • S. Nomizu
  • J. Utsunomiya
Original Article

Abstract

Mutations in hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes were analyzed in patients from 11 Japanese families that had been diagnosed as carrying hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) by clinical examination. Germ line mutations of hMSH2 gene were identified in 5 independent families in which colorectal (87% of patients), endometrial (30%), ovarian (17%), gastric (14%), and other cancers existed. Five mutations detected between codons 136 and 811 included single-base substitutions (C→T and T→G), a T deletion, and an A insertion, all of which produced stop codons resulting in truncated proteins, and an A→T substitution at splice donor site of exon 5 which resulted in deletion of this exon. Moreover, one HNPCC family was presumed to have germ line mutation of hMSH2 gene because a somatic mutation of hMSH2 gene was detected in a cancer from a patient in this family. In addition to these 11 families already diagnosed with HNPCC, 3 new families with germ line mutations of hMSH2 gene and hMLH1 gene were found through analysis of DNA from patients who had multiple cancers with alteration in microsatellite DNA. These mutations included an AG deletion at codons 877–878 of hMSH2 gene, an AAG deletion at codons 616–618 of hMLH1 gene, and a C→T single-base substitution at codon 217 of hMLH1 gene. Seven of eight germ line mutations found in this study are new mutations that have not been reported previously. In families in which germ line mutations were identified presymptomatic examination was then carried out using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA from peripheral blood, and the result was the detection of family members predisposed to HNPCC who did not yet show signs of cancer. These results indicate the value of DNA analysis in the screening and diagnosis of HNPCC patients and families.

Key words

Colorectal neoplasms hereditary Nonpolyposis DNA repair gene Mutation DNA diagnosis 

Abbreviations

HNPCC

Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

PCR

Polymerase chain reaction

SSCP

Single-strand conformation polymorphism

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Miyaki
    • 1
  • M. Konishi
    • 1
  • M. Muraoka
    • 1
  • R. Kikuchi-Yanoshita
    • 1
  • K. Tanaka
    • 1
  • T. Iwama
    • 2
  • T. Mori
    • 3
  • M. Koike
    • 3
  • K. Ushio
    • 4
  • M. Chiba
    • 5
  • S. Nomizu
    • 6
  • J. Utsunomiya
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryTokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical ScienceTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Second Department of SurgeryTokyo Medical and Dental UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Surgery and Department of PathologyTokyo Metropolitan Komagome HospitalTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Division of Diagnostic RadiologyNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Department of Internal MedicineAkita UniversityAkitaJapan
  6. 6.Department of SurgeryHoshi General HospitalFukushimaJapan
  7. 7.Second Department of SurgeryHyogo College of MedicineHyogoJapan

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