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European Journal of Plastic Surgery

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 98–103 | Cite as

A comparative study of three new occlusive dressings for healing of graft donor sites versus conventional therapy

  • J. Terren
  • C. Serna
  • C. Tejerina
  • A. Reig
  • J. Codina
  • P. Baena
  • V. Mirabet
Originals

Summary

A comparative study of four skin graft donor site dressings was undertaken. This was a prospective and cross-over study of 25 consecutive patients with burns up to 40% TBSA treated with split skin grafts. Each donor site was divided into four sections and covered with different dressings in order to evaluate their effectiveness in healing, the time required for complete epithelialization, patient acceptance and any intolerance or local infection. The results showed that the occlusive hydrocolloid dressing significantly decreases (p<0.01) the mean time required for complete healing (7.45 days) compared with a semiocclusive hydrocolloid (10.29 days), a polyurethane sheet (9.4 days) and the conventional dressing (10.04 days).

Key words

Donor site dressings Skin transplantation Wound healing 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Terren
    • 1
  • C. Serna
    • 1
  • C. Tejerina
    • 1
  • A. Reig
    • 1
  • J. Codina
    • 1
  • P. Baena
    • 1
  • V. Mirabet
    • 1
  1. 1.Plastic Surgery and Burns Center Department“La Fe” HospitalValenciaSpain

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