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Morphogenesis of potato plants in vitro. I. Effect of light quality and hormones

  • Nina P. Aksenova
  • Tatyana N. Konstantinova
  • Lydiya I. Sergeeva
  • Ivana Macháčková
  • Svetlana A. Golyanovskaya
Article

Abstract

Stem cuttings of potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Miranda) were cultured in vitro on MS medium with sucrose either without or with addition of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or kinetin (K) under red light (R) or blue light (B). Plants on medium without hormones under R were thin, long, with very small leaves, and produced no or only a few microtubers (after longer-lasting cultivations). In B, plants remained short, thick, with large, wellde-veloped leaves and produced a significant amount of microtubers. Darkening of both roots and shoots strongly promoted tuber formation; the tubers were formed on the darkened part of the plant. IAA had no pronounced effect on plant development in B except for slight lengthening of the stem, and, in longer cultivations, slightly enhanced tuber formation as well. In R, IAA brought about several significant effects: stem reduction and induction of tuber formation being the most significant. Kinetin in R increased tuber formation slightly. In B, kinetin not only strongly stimulated tuber formation, but also increased the total fresh weight and root (+ stolons)/shoot ratio. Results are discussed with regard to the possible role of auxins and/or cytokinins in mediating the morphogenetic effects of light.

Keywords

Kinetin Tuber Formation Potato Plant Light Quality Morphogenetic Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nina P. Aksenova
    • 1
  • Tatyana N. Konstantinova
    • 1
  • Lydiya I. Sergeeva
    • 1
  • Ivana Macháčková
    • 2
  • Svetlana A. Golyanovskaya
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Plant Physiology, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Institute of Experimental Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicPrahaCzech Republic

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