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Human Genetics

, Volume 85, Issue 6, pp 651–654 | Cite as

The human aminopeptidase N gene: isolation, chromosome localization, and DNA polymorphism analysis

  • Valerie M. Watt
  • Huntington F. Willard
Original Investigations

Summary

DNA encoding the human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) gene (PEPN) was first isolated using rat cDNA probes and then used in Southern analysis of DNA from mouse-human somatic cell hybrids to assign this gene to the long-arm region (q11-qter) of human chromosome 15. This human genomic DNA probe detects a frequent DraIII polymorphism that is a useful marker for human chromosome 15.

Keywords

Metabolic Disease Somatic Cell Human Chromosome Chromosome Localization Cell Hybrid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valerie M. Watt
    • 1
  • Huntington F. Willard
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of GeneticsStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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