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Human Genetics

, Volume 85, Issue 6, pp 648–650 | Cite as

Analysis of non-disjunction in sex chromosome tetrasomy and pentasomy

  • Terry Hassold
  • Dorothy Pettay
  • Kristin May
  • Arthur Robinson
Original Investigations

Summary

X-linked DNA markers were used to determine the parental origin of the additional sex chromosomes in eight individuals with sex chromosome tetrasomy or pentasomy. In all cases studied, one parent contributed a single sex chromosome while the other parent contributed three or four sex chromosomes. Thus, it seems likely that most, if not all, sex chromosome tetrasomy and pentasomy is attributable to successive nondisjunctional events involving the same parent.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Metabolic Disease Parental Origin Nondisjunctional Event Chromosome Tetrasomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terry Hassold
    • 1
  • Dorothy Pettay
    • 1
  • Kristin May
    • 1
  • Arthur Robinson
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Medical GeneticsEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory MedicineDenverUSA

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