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An exploration in the space of mathematics educations

  • Seymour Papert
Article

Keywords

Mathematics Education Transpersonal Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seymour Papert
    • 1
  1. 1.Epistemology and Learning GroupMIT Media LabCambridgeUSA

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