Advertisement

Immunogenetics

, Volume 43, Issue 1–2, pp 13–19 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for Humly9: the human homologue of mouse Ly9

  • Mauro S. Sandrin
  • Margaret M. Henning
  • Michael F. Lo
  • Elizabeth Baker
  • Grant R. Sutherland
  • Ian F. C. McKenzie
Original Papers
  • 43 Downloads

Abstract

Ly9 is a mouse cell membrane antigen found on all lymphocytes and coded for by a gene that maps to chromosome 1. We previously described the isolation and characterization of a full-lenght cDNA clone for mouse Ly9. Using cross-species hybridization we isolated cDNA clones encoding the human homologue Humly9. Analysis of the predicted protein sequence suggests that the extra-cellular portion of the Humly9 molecules is composed of four Ig-like domains: a V domain (V) without disulphide bonds and a truncated C2 domain (tC2) with two disulphide bonds, a second V domain without disulphide bonds and a second tC2 with two disulphide bonds, i.e., as V-tC2-V-tC2. The gene encoding Humly9 was mapped to chromosome 1 by analysis of human/hamster hybrids, and more specifically to the 1q22 region by in situ hybridization. The protein sequence data support the view that Humly9 belongs to the immunoglobulin-superfamily subgroup which includes CD48, CD2, and LFA-3.

Keywords

Cell Membrane Protein Sequence Sequence Data cDNA Clone Disulphide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Arulanandam, A. R. N., Moingeon, P., Concino, M. F., Recny, M. A., Kato, K., Yagita, H., Koyasu, S., and Reinherz, E. L. A soluble multimeric recombinant CD2 protein identifies CD48 as a low affinity ligand for human CD2: divergence of CD2 ligands during evolution of humans and mice. J Exp Med 177: 1439–1450, 1993Google Scholar
  2. Bailey, D. W. Recombinant-inbred strains. An aid to finding identity, linkage and function of histocompatibility and other genes. Transplantation 11: 325–327, 1971Google Scholar
  3. Callen, D. F., Baker, E., Eyre, H. J., Chernos, J. E., Bell, J. A., and Sutherland, G. R. Reassessment of two apparent deletions of chromosome 16p to an ins (11;16) and a t(1;16) by chromosome painting. Ann Genet 33: 219–221, 1990Google Scholar
  4. Chang, H. C., Moingeon, P., Lopez, P., Krasnow, H., Stebbins, C., and Reinherz, E. L. Dissection of the human CD2 intracellular domain. Identification of a segment required for signal transduction and interleukin 2 production. J Exp Med 169: 2073–2083, 1989Google Scholar
  5. Durda, P. J., Boos, S. C., and Gottlieb, P. D. T100: A new murine cell surface glycoprotein detected by anti-Lyt-2.1 serum. J Immunol 122: 1407–1412, 1979Google Scholar
  6. Festenstein, H. Immunogenetic and biological aspects of in vitro lymphocyte allotransformation (MLR) in the mouse. Transplant Rev 15: 62–88, 1973Google Scholar
  7. He, Q., Beyers, A. D., Barclay, A. N., and Williams, A. F. A role in transmembrane signaling for the cytoplasmic domain of the CD2 T lymphocyte surface antigen. Cell 54: 979–984, 1988Google Scholar
  8. Hogarth, P. M., Craig, J., and McKenzie, I. F. C. A monoclonal antibody detecting the Ly9.2 (Lpg-100) cell-membrane alloantigen. Immunogenetics 11: 65–74, 1980Google Scholar
  9. Kingsmore, J. F., Watson, M. L., Morely, W. S., and Seldin, M. F. Physical linkage of genes encoding the lymphocyte adhesion molecule CD2 and its ligand LFA-3. Immunogenetics 30: 123–125, 1989Google Scholar
  10. Kozak, C. A., Davidson, W. F., and Morse, H. C. Genetic and functional relationships of the retroviral lnd lymphocyte alloantigen 3-ci on mouse Chromosome 1. Immunogenetics 19: 163–168, 1984Google Scholar
  11. Ledbetter, J. A., Goding, J. W., Tsu, T. T., and Herzenberg, L. A. A new mouse lymphoid alloantigen (Lgp-100) recognized by a monoclonal rat antibody. Immunogenetics 8: 347–360, 1979Google Scholar
  12. Mathieson, B. J., Sharrow, S. O., Bottomly, K., and Fowlkes, B. J. Ly9, an alloantigenic marker of lymphocyte differentiation. J Immunol 125: 2127–2136, 1980Google Scholar
  13. Sandrin, M. S., Gumley, T. P., Henning, M. M., Vaughan, H. A., Gonez, L. J., Trapani, J. A., and McKenzie, I. F. C. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for mouse Ly9. J Immunol 149: 1636–1641, 1992Google Scholar
  14. Sandrin, M. S., Mouhtouris, E., Vaughan, H. A., Warren, H. S., and Parish, C. R. CD48 is a low affinity ligand for human CD2. J Immunol 151: 4606–4613, 1993Google Scholar
  15. Sewell, W. A., Palmer, R. M., Spurr, W. K., Sheer, D., Brown, M. H., Bell, Y., and Crumpton, M. J. The human LFA-3 gene is located at the same chromosome band as the gene for its receptor CD2. Immunogenetics 28: 278–282, 1988Google Scholar
  16. Shen, F-W. and Boyse, E. A. An alloantigen selective for B cells: Ly-17.1. Immunogenetics 11: 315–317, 1980Google Scholar
  17. Tada, N., Kimura, S., Liu-Lam, Y., and Hammerling, U. Mouse alloantigen system Ly-m22 predominantly expressed on T lymphocytes and controlled by a gene linked to Mls region on chromosome 1. Hybridoma 2: 29–38, 1983Google Scholar
  18. Williams, A. F. A year in the life of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Immuno Today 8: 298–303, 1987Google Scholar
  19. Williams, A. F., Davis, S. J., He, Q., and Barclay, A. N. Structural diversity in domains of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Cold Spring Harbor Symp Quant Biol 54: 637–647, 1989Google Scholar
  20. Wong, Y. W., Williams, A. F., Kingsmore, S. F., and Seldin, M. F. Structure, expression, and genetic linkage of the mouse BCM1 (OX45 or Blast1) antigen. Evidence for genetic duplication giving rise to the BCM1 region on mouse chromosome 1 and the CD2/LFA3 region on mouse chromosome 3. J Exp Med 171: 2115–2130, 1990Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro S. Sandrin
    • 1
  • Margaret M. Henning
    • 1
  • Michael F. Lo
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Baker
    • 2
  • Grant R. Sutherland
    • 2
  • Ian F. C. McKenzie
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular Immunogenetics LaboratoryAustin Research Institute Austin HospitalHeidelbergAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics Women's and Children's HospitalNorth AdelaideAustralia

Personalised recommendations