The clinical investigator

, Volume 70, Issue 7, pp 588–594 | Cite as

Treatment of diarrhoea in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with immunoglobulins from bovine colostrum

  • J. A. Rump
  • R. Arndt
  • A. Arnold
  • C. Bendick
  • H. Dichtelmüller
  • M. Franke
  • E. B. Helm
  • H. Jäger
  • B. Kampmann
  • P. Kolb
  • W. Kreuz
  • R. Lissner
  • W. Meigel
  • P. Ostendorf
  • H. H. Peter
  • A. Plettenberg
  • I. Schedel
  • H. W. Stellbrink
  • W. Stephan
Original Article

Summary

Diarrhoea and weight loss are found in more than 50% of patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In some patients the symptoms can be very severe, leading to death even in the absence of opportunistic infections. In 30% of these patients, enteric pathogens cannot be identified, and approximately only half of the identifiable aetiologic agents of diarrhoea in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were treatable with antibiotics. Immunoglobulins from bovine colostrum (Lactobin, Biotest, Dreieich, FRG) contain high titers of antibodies against a wide range of bacterial, viral and protozoal pathogens as well as against various bacterial toxins. Lactobin (LIG) is quite resistant to 24-h incubation with gastric juice. In a multi-center pilot study 37 immunodeficiency patients with chronic diarrhoea [29 HIV-infected patients, 2 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), one unidentified immunodeficiency, five patients with graft versus host disease (GvHD) following bone marrow transplantation] were treated with oral LIG (10 g/day for 10 days). Good therapeutic effects were observed. Out of 31 treatment periods in 29 HIV-infected patients 21 gave good results leading to transient (10 days) or long-lasting (more than 4 weeks) normalisation of the stool frequency. The mean daily stool frequency decreased from 7.4 to 2.2 at the end of the treatment. Eight HIV-infected patients showed no response. The diarrhoea recurred in 12 patients within 4 weeks (32.4%), while 19 patients were free of diarrhoea for at least 4 weeks (51.3%). In 5 patients intestinal cryptosporidiosis disappeared following oral LIG treatment. LIG treatment was also beneficial in 4 out of 5 GvHD patients. No serious side effects were recorded in any of the treated patients.

Key words

Diarrhoea Colostrum-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome Human immunodeficiency virus Cryptosporidiosis 

Abbreviations

AIDS

acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

ALL/3

acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (FAB classification type 3)

AML/1

acute myeloblastic leukaemia (FAB classification type 1)

CDC

center of disease control

CML/CP

chronic myelocytic leukaemia (chronic phase)

CMV

cytomegalovirus

CVID

common variable immunodeficiency

DHPG

1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl-guanine (gancyclovir)

ELISA

enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

GvHD

graft versus host reaction

HIV

human immunodeficiency virus

IgA

immunoglobulin A

IgG

immunoglobulin G

IgM

immunoglobulin M

INH

isoniazid

LIG

Lactobin

MAI

mycobacterium avium intracellulare

RAEB-T

refractory anaemia with excess of blasts-transformation

SD

standard deviation

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Rump
    • 1
    • 14
  • R. Arndt
    • 2
  • A. Arnold
    • 3
  • C. Bendick
    • 4
  • H. Dichtelmüller
    • 3
  • M. Franke
    • 5
  • E. B. Helm
    • 6
  • H. Jäger
    • 7
  • B. Kampmann
    • 4
  • P. Kolb
    • 8
  • W. Kreuz
    • 9
  • R. Lissner
    • 3
  • W. Meigel
    • 10
  • P. Ostendorf
    • 11
  • H. H. Peter
    • 1
    • 12
  • A. Plettenberg
    • 10
  • I. Schedel
    • 10
  • H. W. Stellbrink
    • 13
  • W. Stephan
    • 3
  1. 1.Abteilung Rheumatologie und Klinische ImmunologieMedizinische Universitäts-Klinik FreiburgFreiburg i.Br.
  2. 2.Institut für angewandte ImmunologieHamburg Poppenbüttel
  3. 3.Universitäts-HautklinikKöln
  4. 4.Biotest Pharma GmbHDreieich
  5. 5.Medizinische Universitäts-Klinik IKöln
  6. 6.Medizinische Universitäts-KlinikFrankfurt/Main
  7. 7.Städtisches Krankenhaus SchwabingMünchen
  8. 8.Klinikum GroßhadernMünchen
  9. 9.Universitäts-KinderklinikFrankfurt/Main
  10. 10.Abteilung DermatologieAllgemeines Krankenhaus St. GeorgHamburg
  11. 11.Medizinische KlinikMarienkrankenhausHamburg
  12. 12.Abt VII: Immunologie und TransfusionsmedizinMedizinische Hochschule Hannover, Zentrum für Innere Medizin und DermatologieGermany
  13. 13.I. Med. KlinikUniversitäts-Krankenhaus EppendorfHamburg
  14. 14.Abteilung Rheumatologie und Klinische ImmunologieMedizinische Universitäts-Klinik FreiburgFreiburgFRG

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