Investigational New Drugs

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 369–371 | Cite as

Phase II study of intravenous 6-thioguanine in patients with advanced carcinoma of the pancreas

  • Jaffer A. Ajani
  • Richard Pazdur
  • Rodger J. Winn
  • James L. Abbruzzese
  • Bernard Levin
  • Robert Belt
  • James Young
  • Yehuda Z. Patt
  • Irwin H. Krakoff
Clinical Studies

Summary

In a phase II study, 32 patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma were treated with intravenous 6-thioguanine. A 30-min infusion of 55 mg/m2 (starting dose) was administered once a day for 5 consecutive days, the course being repeated every 5 weeks. A median of two courses (range, 1–10) was administered. Among the 32 patients, 30 having measurable cancer and optimum follow-up were fully assessable for response. One patient achieved a partial response of extensive liver metastases (12 + months), and another patient had a transient minor response (5 weeks). Cancer in 27 of 30 assessable patients progressed during intravenous 6-thioguanine treatment. Myelosuppression, although frequent, was mild to moderate at these doses and did not result in significant morbidity. Nonhematologic toxicities were also mild. Our data suggest that intravenous 6-thioguanine given at this schedule is ineffective in previously untreated patients with advanced carcinoma of the pancreas.

key words

intravenous 6-thioguanine pancreatic carcinoma 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaffer A. Ajani
    • 1
  • Richard Pazdur
    • 1
  • Rodger J. Winn
    • 1
  • James L. Abbruzzese
    • 1
  • Bernard Levin
    • 1
  • Robert Belt
    • 1
  • James Young
    • 1
  • Yehuda Z. Patt
    • 1
  • Irwin H. Krakoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Oncology, Division of MedicineThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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