Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 38, Issue 5, pp 619–623

Effect of temperature and oxygen on cell growth and recombinant protein production in insect cell cultures

  • S. Reuveny
  • Y. J. Kim
  • C. W. Kemp
  • J. Shiloach
Applied Genetics and Regulation

Abstract

The effect of temperature and O2 saturation on the production of recombinant proteins β-galactosidase and human glucocerebrosidase by Spodoptera frugiperda cells (Sf9) infected with recombinant Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus was investigated. The rates of cell growth, glucose consumption, O2 consumption and product expression were measured at temperatures between 22° C and 35° C. The results indicated that possible O2 limitation may be alleviated without compromising the maximum cell yield by lowering the incubation temperature from 27° C to 25° C. The expression level of the recombinant proteins at 27° C was similar to that obtained at 22° C and 25° C; lower protein yields were obtained at 30° C. An increase in temperature from 22° C to 27° C led to earlier production of the proteins and to an increase in the proportion of the product released outside the cells.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Reuveny
    • 1
  • Y. J. Kim
    • 1
  • C. W. Kemp
    • 2
  • J. Shiloach
    • 1
  1. 1.Biotechnology Unit, LCDB, NIDDK, NIHBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.BioWhittaker, Inc.WalkersvilleUSA

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