Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 119–123 | Cite as

Methanogenesis from lactate by a co-culture of Clostridium formicoaceticum and Methanosarcina mazei

  • Shang-Tian Yang
  • I-Ching Tang
Environmental Microbiology

Summary

A co-culture of Clostridium formicoaceticum and Methanosarcina mazei converted lactate to methane and carbon dioxide at mesophilic temperatures and pH values near 7.0. Lactate was first converted to acetate by the homoacetogen, and then to CH4 and CO2 by the methanogen, with the second reaction as the rate-limiting step. The methane yield was about 1.45 mol/mol lactate. These two organisms formed a mutualistic association and may be useful together with the homolactic bacterium Stretococcus lactis to convert lactose to methane.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shang-Tian Yang
    • 1
  • I-Ching Tang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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