Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology

, Volume 350, Issue 4, pp 361–364 | Cite as

Possible role of nitric oxide in 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced increase in vascular permeability in mouse skin

  • Emiko Fujii
  • Kaoru Irie
  • Yoko Uchida
  • Fujiko Tsukahara
  • Takamura Muraki
Original Articles

Abstract

In order to test the hypothesis that a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced increase in vascular permeability results from a cascade triggered by activation of the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), the vascular permeability was investigated using the Pontamine sky blue leakage method in male mice. Subcutaneous injection of 5-HT induced a dose-related increase of vascular permeability at the injection site. The vascular permeability induced by 5-HT was inhibited by pretreatment with intraperitoneal injection of ketanserin (5-HT2A antagonist) and methysergide (5-HT1/2A antagonist), less efficiently by 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-phthalimido)butyl] piperazine (NAN-190) (5-HT1A antagonist), but not by granisetron (5-HT3 antagonist). Increase in vascular permeability induced by 5-HT was inhibited by concurrent intravenous administration of NO synthase inhibitors NG-nitro-Lrarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and methylene blue but not by the inactive enantiomer NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (D-NAME). These results suggest that 5-HT increases vascular permeability by activating the 5-HT receptors and that endogenous NO is involved in this effect of 5-HT.

Key words

Vascular permeability 5-Hydroxytryptamine Nitric oxide Ketanserin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emiko Fujii
    • 1
  • Kaoru Irie
    • 1
  • Yoko Uchida
    • 1
  • Fujiko Tsukahara
    • 1
  • Takamura Muraki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyTokyo women's Medical CollegeTokyoJapan

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