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European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

, Volume 252, Issue 6, pp 321–324 | Cite as

The potential uses of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with head and neck cancer

  • D. Donath
  • T. Vuong
  • G. Shenouda
  • B. MacDonald
  • R. Tabah
Original Paper

Abstract

Brachytherapy has proven to be an extremely valuable method of treatment for head and neck cancer. The data supporting its application, however, is based on continuous low-dose-rate brachytherapy. To benefit from improved radiation protection, outpatient treatments, and increased patient tolerance of treatment set-up over that encountered in conventional low-dose-rate manually afterloaded brachytherapy, we implemented a high-dose-rate remote afterloading approach in selected patients with head and neck cancers. This treatment was utilized in two different roles in managing 29 patients. In its first role, it was used as the sole treatment in 13 patients with T1–2 NO malignancies. A total of ten treatments of 450–500 cGy each were delivered twice a day with a minimum of 5–6 h between treatments. With a median follow-up of 9 months, only 1 patient failed locally. In a second role, brachytherapy was applied in a post-operative adjuvant setting following wide local excision of tumors in patients who presented with recurrent disease (12 cases) or a second primary in the head and neck (4 cases). All patients had previously received external irradiation to the head and neck. Due to this previous course of irradiation, only eight treatments of 300 cGy each were delivered, for a total of 2400 cGy over a period of 4 days. However, with a follow-up of 2–16 months, only 3 patients remain disease-free.

Key words

Head and neck cancer Brachytherapy Irradiation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Donath
    • 1
  • T. Vuong
    • 1
  • G. Shenouda
    • 1
  • B. MacDonald
    • 1
  • R. Tabah
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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