Transportation

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 231–247 | Cite as

Evidence of land use impacts of rapid transit systems

  • Robert L. Knight
  • Lisa L. Trygg

Abstract

This paper draws from the findings of published empirical studies and observations of the impacts of rapid transit systems on urban development. Analysis is based on comparisons of impact findings by different researchers and for different cities. An initial set of key issues is proposed, against which available information is arrayed and compared. It is concluded that rapid transit can have substantial growth-focusing impacts, but only if other supporting factors are present.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Knight
    • 1
  • Lisa L. Trygg
    • 1
  1. 1.De LeuwCather & CompanySan FranciscoUSA

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