European Journal of Nuclear Medicine

, Volume 19, Issue 11, pp 971–986 | Cite as

Gamma scintigraphy in the evaluation of pharmaceutical dosage forms

  • S. S. Davis
  • J. G. Hardy
  • S. P. Newman
  • I. R. Wilding
Review Article

Abstract

Gamma-scintigraphy is applied extensively in the development and evaluation of pharmaceutical drug delivery systems. It is used particularly for monitoring formulations in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. The radiolabelling is generally achieved by the incorporation of an appropriate technetium-99m or indium-111 labelled radiopharmaceutical into the formulation. In the case of complex dosage forms, such as enteric-coated tablets, labelling is best undertaken by the addition of a non-radioactive tracer such as samarium-152 oxide or erbium-170 oxide followed by neutron activation of the final product. Systems investigated include tablets and multiparticulates for oral administration, enemas and suppositories, metered dose inhalers and nebulisers, and nasal sprays and drops. Gamma-scintigraphy provides information on the deposition, dispersion and movement of the formulation. The combination of such studies with the assay of drug levels in blood or urine specimens, pharmacoscintigraphy, provides information concerning the sites of drug release and absorption. Data acquired from the scintigraphic evaluation of pharmaceutical dosage forms are now being used increasingly at all stages of product development, from the assessment of prototype delivery systems to supporting the product licence application.

Key words

Drug delivery Pharmacoscintigraphy Neutron activation Gastrointestinal tract Respiratory tract Tablets Capsules Aerosols Enemas Nasal sprays 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. S. Davis
    • 1
  • J. G. Hardy
    • 1
  • S. P. Newman
    • 1
  • I. R. Wilding
    • 1
  1. 1.Pharmaceutical Profiles LimitedHighfields Science ParkUK

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