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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 40, Issue 6, pp 812–817 | Cite as

A novel membrane bioreactor for microbial growth

  • S. Beetom
  • B. J. Bellhouse
  • C. J. Knowles
  • H. R. Millward
  • A. M. Nicholson
  • J. R. Wyatt
Biotechnology

Abstract

A novel membrane bioreactor, previously assessed for its gas transfer characteristics, was used in various size and membrane configurations for the growth of the strictly aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bioreactor was found to readily support growth, and the initial growth rates showed the previously demonstrated enhanced effect in gas O2 mass transfer of the dimpled membrane bioreactor over flat membrane bioreactors. The production of a secondary metabolite by a Pseudomonas sp. following growth was demonstrated, as was the biotransformation of a nitrile by Nocardia rhodochrous with the removal of the biotransformation products across a membrane. The potential of the bioreactor, in terms of other applications in the field of biotechnology, is disscussed.

Keywords

Growth Rate Mass Transfer Nitrile Pseudomonas Secondary Metabolite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Beetom
    • 1
  • B. J. Bellhouse
    • 2
  • C. J. Knowles
    • 3
  • H. R. Millward
    • 2
  • A. M. Nicholson
    • 3
  • J. R. Wyatt
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Applied BiologyUniversity of Central LancashirePrestonUK
  2. 2.Medical Engineering Unit, Department of Engineering SciencesUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  3. 3.Biological LaboratoryUniversity of KentCanterburyUK
  4. 4.Viridian Bioprocessing LimitedChestfiled, WhitstableUK

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