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Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp 347–349 | Cite as

Rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase: a novel enzyme from Aspergillus aculeatus, specific for the deacetylation of hairy (ramified) regions of pectins

  • M. J. F. Searle-van Leeuwen
  • L. A. M. van den Broek
  • H. A. Schols
  • G. Beldman
  • A. G. J. Voragen
Biochemical Engineering Short Contribution

Abstract

Rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, able to specifically hydrolyse the acetyl asters present in modified hairy (ramified) regions (MHR) of apple pectin, was identified. The enzyme removed about 70% of the total acetyl groups in MHR. This acetylesterase did not cause the release of acetyl groups from a range of other acetylated substrates, either synthetic or extracted from plants, including the acetylated smooth regions present in beet pectin. Pretreatment of pectic polysaccharides in order to remove arabinose side chains had no effect on the acetyl release, wor was an effect found on the rate or degree of acetyl release, when the purified acetylesterase was combined with pectolytic enzymes, pectin methylesterase or arabinanases.

Keywords

Enzyme Polysaccharide Acetyl Aspergillus Pectin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. F. Searle-van Leeuwen
    • 1
  • L. A. M. van den Broek
    • 1
  • H. A. Schols
    • 1
  • G. Beldman
    • 1
  • A. G. J. Voragen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceWageningen Agricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands

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