Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 44, Issue 3–4, pp 459–465

Optimization of bacteriocin-release-protein-induced protein release by Escherichia coli: extracellular production of the periplasmic molecular chaperone FaeE

  • F. J. van der Wal
  • C. M. ten Hagen-Jongman
  • B. Oudega
  • J. Luirink
Applied Genetics and Regulation Original Paper

Abstract

Expression of the pCloDF13-encoded bacteriocin-release protein (BRP) results in the release of periplasmic proteins into the culture medium. The BRP-mediated release of a periplasmic protein was investigated and optimized. As a periplasmic model protein, the 50-kDa dimeric E. coli fimbrial molecular chaperone FaeE was used. Plasmids were constructed for the simultaneous expression of the BRP and FaeE, controlled by independently inducible promoters. The efficiency of FaeE release increased when the BRP was targeted by the unstable murein lipoprotein signal peptide, instead of by its own stable signal peptide. Furthermore, optimal efficacy of FaeE release was found when cells of E. coli strain C600 were used, which harboured one plasmid encoding both FaeE and BRP instead of two separate plasmids and which were cultured at 37°C in broth supplemented with MgCl2. Maximal production levels of 21 mg FaeE/l culture were obtained.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. J. van der Wal
    • 1
  • C. M. ten Hagen-Jongman
    • 1
  • B. Oudega
    • 1
  • J. Luirink
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Institute of Molecular Biological SciencesBiocentrum AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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