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Space Science Reviews

, Volume 6, Issue 5, pp 601–654 | Cite as

Unmanned scientific exploration throughout the solar system

  • Maxwell W. HunterII
Article

Abstract

Velocity requirements for scientific probe vehicles operating throughout the entire solar system are presented. Both direct flights and those using planetary swingby modes are considered. Launch-vehicle and payload sizes necessary to perform useful scientific missions are examined. Scientific investigation of the solar system is shown to be much less difficult than is commonly believed.

Keywords

Solar System Scientific Investigation Scientific Exploration Direct Flight Scientific Mission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maxwell W. HunterII
    • 1
  1. 1.NASA Programs, Lockheed Missiles & Space CompanySunnyvaleU.S.A.

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