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Population Research and Policy Review

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 205–234 | Cite as

The effects of the child support provisions of the Family Support Act of 1988 on child well-being

  • Irwin Garfinkel
  • Sara Mc Lanahan
Article

Abstract

The provisions for child support reform in the Family Support Act of 1988 are likely to have a large impact upon the well-being of children eligible for child support, a group expected to include half of the children in the country. The reform is expected to increase child support payments and thereby reduce the economic insecurity and poverty of children who live apart from a parent. It is also expected to lead to increased contact between noncustodial parents and their children, which may also enhance well-being. This paper reviews the child support system in the United States, summarizes the empirical research that has been carried out on children from disrupted families, analyzes the impact that the Family Support Act may have on child well-being, and discusses the key variables that should be measured as well as the most promising sources of data to evaluate child support reform.

Keywords

Support System Economic Policy Empirical Research Large Impact Family Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irwin Garfinkel
    • 1
  • Sara Mc Lanahan
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Social Work and Institute for Research on Poverty, University of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Sociology and Institute for Research on PovertyUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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