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Artificial Intelligence Review

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 3–34 | Cite as

An introduction to case-based reasoning

  • Janet L. Kolodner
Article

Abstract

Case-based reasoning means using old experiences to understand and solve new problems. In case-based reasoning, a reasoner remembers a previous situation similar to the current one and uses that to solve the new problem. Case-based reasoning can mean adapting old solutions to meet new demands; using old cases to explain new situations; using old cases to critique new solutions; or reasoning from precedents to interpret a new situation (much like lawyers do) or create an equitable solution to a new problem (much like labor mediators do). This paper discusses the processes involved in case-based reasoning and the tasks for which case-based reasoning is useful.

Key Words

Case-based reasoning problem-solving experience 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of ComputingGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaU.S.A.

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