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Documenta Ophthalmologica

, Volume 69, Issue 2, pp 167–174 | Cite as

Color vision testing with a computer graphics system: Preliminary results

  • Geoffrey Arden
  • Kemal Gündüz
  • Scott Perry
Article

Abstract

We report a method for computer enhancement of color vision tests. In our graphics system 256 colors are selected from a much larger range and displayed on a screen divided into 768 × 288 pixels. Eight-bit digital-to-analogue converters drive a high quality monitor with separate inputs to the red, green, and blue amplifiers and calibrated gun chromaticities. The graphics are controlled by a PASCAL program written for a personal computer, which calculates the values of the red, green, and blue signals and specifies them in Commité Internationale d'Eclairage X, Y, and Z fundamentals, so changes in chrominance occur without changes in luminance. The system for measuring color contrast thresholds with gratings is more than adequate in normal observers. In patients with mild retinal damage in whom other tests of visual function are normal, this method of testing color vision shows specific increases in contrast thresholds along tritan color-confusion lines. By the time the Hardy-Rand-Rittler and Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue tests disclose abnormalities, gross defects in color contrast threshold can be seen with our system.

Key words

Color vision diabetes computer graphics 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey Arden
    • 1
  • Kemal Gündüz
    • 1
  • Scott Perry
    • 1
  1. 1.Electrodiagnostic Dept.Moorfields Eye HospitalLondonUK

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