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Climatic Change

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 85–93 | Cite as

The migration of geese as an indicator of climate change in the southern Hudson Bay region between 1715 and 1851

  • Timothy Ball
Article

Abstract

Observations and records maintained by the Hudson's Bay Company at York Factory and Churchill Factory on Hudson Bay between 1714 and 1825, serve as the source of information for a study of changes in the date of arrival of geese as a phonological indicator of climatic change. Changes in the migration pattern of geese are reflected in the changing date of arrival at the same location over a long period of time. Variations in this date are determined to be a function of southerly or tailwinds in the northward spring migration.

Keywords

Climate Change Migration Migration Pattern Spring Migration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Other references

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Co 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy Ball
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WinnipegWinnipegCanada

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