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Human Studies

, Volume 12, Issue 3–4, pp 185–209 | Cite as

Harvey Sacks — Lectures 1964–1965 an introduction/memoir

  • Emanuel A. Schegloff
Article

Keywords

Political Philosophy Modern Philosophy 
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emanuel A. Schegloff

There are no affiliations available

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