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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 23–37 | Cite as

Agroforestry: a viable land use of alkali soils

  • P. Ahmed
Article

Abstract

A system of land use of alkaline wastelands of the Indo-Gangetic plain has been proposed consisting of planting Prosopis juliflora, a multi-purpose tree species, with the objectives of economic return as well as soil amelioration. Tree farming onalkaline wastelands provides not only fuel, fodder, timber and income to the rural population but also shows good effects in improving the soil characteristics. The detailed costs of such an agroforestry system on alkali soils have been worked out and the mean annual production of Prosopis juliflora on soils of different pH have been analysed. In spite of the high cost of establishing a plantation, an economic analysis of the system yields a 9.5% internal rate of return which is reasonably high for degraded lands of strongly alkali soils and also viable within the economic structure of the region.

Keywords

Tree Species Economic Analysis Rural Population Soil Characteristic Agroforestry System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Ahmed
    • 1
  1. 1.Indian Forest ServiceGovt of HaryanaChandigarhIndia

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