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Computers and the Humanities

, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 351–361 | Cite as

Electronic lexicography

  • Harry M. Logan
Article

Abstract

This paper offers a brief survey of some important developments in the use of computers in making dictionaries and lexicons. Making a dictionary involves collecting the data, sorting and lemmatizing, editing and printing. Five major types of machine-readable dictionaries have developed from these procedures: Machine Readable Lexicons of individual authors, Machine Readable Dictionaries with codes for linguistic information, Machine Dictionaries with selected information, and Lexical Databases with lexical information abstracted from machine-readable dictionaries. The second edition of the QED is a machine-readable dictionary with codes that may provide the basis for a diachronic lexical database.

Key Words

corpora databases dictionary informatiop retrieval systems lemmatization lexicography lexicology lexicon machine readable OED2 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry M. Logan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EnglishUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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