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Instructional Science

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 313–327 | Cite as

Real education in non-real time: The use of electronic message systems for instruction

  • Clark N. Quinn
  • Hugh Mehan
  • James A. Levin
  • Steven D. Black
Article

Abstract

Education in different communication media takes place with functional differences that have consequences for the course of instructional interaction. In this paper, we examine instructional interaction among people using a computer-based electronic message system, contrasting it with conventional face-to-face discussion in a college level class. Interaction via the non-real time message system contained multiple “threads of discourse,” a higher proportion of student turns to teacher turns, and other deviations from the “initiation-response-evaluation” sequences usually found in face-to-face classroom interactions. Based on the results of our contrast, we describe ways to organize instruction using electronic message systems to take advantage of new properties and to avoid shortcomings of these new instructional media.

Keywords

Communication Medium Functional Difference Level Class College Level Classroom Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clark N. Quinn
    • 1
  • Hugh Mehan
    • 1
  • James A. Levin
    • 1
  • Steven D. Black
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Comparative Human CognitionUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaU.S.A.

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