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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 257–268 | Cite as

Pasture floristic composition in different Eucalyptus species plantations in some parts of northern Guinea savanna zone of Nigeria

  • A. B. I. Igboanugo
  • J. E. Omijeh
  • J. O. Adegbehin
Article

Abstract

In view of the recurrent drought and human population pressures which have drastically reduced the density of pasture species within the Nigerian savannas, the nomadic herdsmen rely mostly on silvipastoralism, grazing their herds in Eucalyptus plantations. In this study, the population of understorey forage and non-forage speicies and the relative light intensities on the forest floors of two Eucalyptus species, viz: E. citridodora, and E. camaldŭlensis were compared with those of open savanna lands at Kabama, Samaru and Guga, all within the Northern Guinea savanna zone.

At normal 3 m by 3 m spacing between trees, the herbages were fewer in the plantations and the E. citridora plantation had only about half the number of species observed under E. camaldŭlensis in the same and other sites despite similarities in light intensity levels in all the plantations. This information forms a guideline in using eucalyptus silvo-pastoral farms.

Key words

Nigeria Northern Guinea savanna Eucalyptus plantations understorey herbage improved silvo-pastoralism 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. I. Igboanugo
    • 1
  • J. E. Omijeh
    • 1
  • J. O. Adegbehin
    • 2
  1. 1.Savanna Forestry Research StationForestry Research Institute of Nigeria, P.M.B.Samaru-ZariaNigeria
  2. 2.Agricultural Extension & Research Liaison ServicesAhmadu Bello UniversityZariaNigeria

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