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Journal of the History of Biology

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 1–53 | Cite as

Darwin and his finches: The evolution of a legend

  • Frank J. Sulloway
Special Section on Darwin and Darwinism

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Co 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank J. Sulloway
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Social RelationsHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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