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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 189–203 | Cite as

From research to communication in agroforestry: Some insights from the MAB Programme

  • Francesco Di Castri
  • John Celecia
  • Malcolm Hadley
Article

Abstract

Attempts within the Man and Biosphere (MAB) Programme of Unesco to produce research findings and information materials useful for education and training in agroforestry are outlined. Three different field projects — one in the humid tropics of Mexico, another in an urban situation in Papua New Guinea, the third in the arid zones of northern Kenya — provide examples of the types of educational materials and training activities that can be integrated within field research projects. Lessons learned in the preparation of a poster-exhibit ‘Ecology in Action’, and their possible relevance to the development of programmes in agroforestry education, are described.

Keywords

Research Finding Field Research Educational Material Arid Zone Training Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco Di Castri
    • 1
  • John Celecia
    • 1
  • Malcolm Hadley
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Ecological SciencesUnescoParisFrance

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