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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 95–118 | Cite as

Agroforestry systems in North America

  • T. H. Bandolin
  • R. F. Fisher
Article

Abstract

Agroforestry systems in North America vary widely in terms of components (tree, forb, graminoid, and shrub species) and outputs. Most of the agroforestry systems used in North America have emphasized wood and livestock production. The objective of each system has been to produce annual and long term economic returns and sustainable yields. Inputs such as fossil fuels, fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides are relatively low compared to those used in conventional agriculture.

Major agroforestry system types in each of eight North American regions are described. The major species used as vegetational components in each system are enumerated by region. The numerous variations in how these components are mixed have created an almost endless number of actual systems. Management problems and solutions, economic concerns, and system comparisons have also been addressed for each region.

Key words

North America agroforestry intercropping livestock grazing forest farming 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. H. Bandolin
    • 1
  • R. F. Fisher
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Forest Resources, College of Natural ResourcesUtah State UniversityLoganUSA
  2. 2.Department of Forest Science Texas A & M UniversityCollege StationTexasUSA

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