Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 3, Issue 9, pp 939–950

Hunting among Moka Bubis in Bioko: dynamics of faunal exploitation at the village level

  • Montserrat Colell
  • Carmen Maté
  • John E. Fa
Papers

DOI: 10.1007/BF00129668

Cite this article as:
Colell, M., Maté, C. & Fa, J.E. Biodivers Conserv (1994) 3: 939. doi:10.1007/BF00129668

Hunting by Bubi villages around Moka, Bioko, and their impact on the local prey fauna was studied during July–August, 1992. Questionnaires were sent to 45 known hunters in the region in order to find out their techniques and hunting procedures. Hunting trips were also followed (a total of 204 km covered) and counts of animals brought to the villages from 103 recorded trips were also made. There were two main hunting methods employed: trapping and shooting. Most commonly used was snare trapping. At least five different types were used during the study. Guns were less commonly employed. Both techniques are efficient and productive but prey caught by each method differed. Most animals caught by snares were large rodents (Atherurus africanus, Cricetomys emini) and small antelopes (Cephalophus monticola) whereas those shot were usually antelopes (C. monticola and C. ogilbyi), monkeys (Cercopithecus spp.) and, when accompanied by dogs, drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus). The effects of hunting in the region is acute especially since they incur upon the proclaimed protected areas in the south of the island. Hunting trips are gradually being lengthened and areas which were originally unaffected by this activity are now part of the villages' hunting zones.

Keywords

hunting Moka Bubis Bioko 

Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Montserrat Colell
    • 1
  • Carmen Maté
    • 1
  • John E. Fa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department de Psiquiatria i Psicobiologia Clínica, Facultat de PsicologiaUniversitat of BarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Jersey Wildlife Preservation TrustJerseyUK

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