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Artificial Intelligence Review

, Volume 5, Issue 1–2, pp 89–119 | Cite as

A survey of techniques for inference under uncertainty

  • F. K. J. Sheridan
Article

Abstract

The field of automated inference under uncertainty is too large and too young for elegant, unified presentation. We present, rather, a discussion of the principal techniques under some broad classifications. For the most important or least known techniques, we present, as appendices, introductory tutorials in order to give the reader some idea of the basic methods involved; other techniques we describe more briefly. First, after this introduction, we must cover some basic terms and philosophical ideas.

Keywords

Neural Network Artificial Intelligence Complex System Nonlinear Dynamics Basic Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Intellect Ltd 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. K. J. Sheridan
    • 1
  1. 1.Balliol CollegeOxfordUK

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