New Forests

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 31–43 | Cite as

Underplanting western hemlock in a red alder thinning: early survival, growth, and damage

  • William H. Emmingham
  • Michael Bondi
  • David E. Hibbs
General Papers

Abstract

Underplanting conifers beneath thinned hardwood stands could shorten conversion to a more valuable crop species. Thinning the hardwoods to final crop-tree spacing could increase growth and marketable volume while releasing the site resources necessary to support conifers planted in the understory. In western Oregon, an experimental thinning of a 14-year-old red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) stand provided an opportunity to test this concept. Initial efforts were directed toward testing survival and growth of wilding seedlings of western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla [Raf.] Sarg.) planted in thinned and unthinned alder stands. Survival averaged 78% and 52% after the first and fifth growing seasons. Fifth-year height growth of surviving seedlings averaged from 38 to 49 cm under various thinning regimes but only 9 cm in the unthinned. Wildlife browsing and the pinning of seedlings by falling debris reduced growth and survival.

Key words

wildling seedlings underplanting two-storied stands stand conversion damage from animals and debris 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • William H. Emmingham
    • 1
  • Michael Bondi
    • 2
  • David E. Hibbs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forest ScienceOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  2. 2.OSU Extension ServiceClackamas CountyOregon CityUSA

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