Advertisement

Population Research and Policy Review

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 91–116 | Cite as

The effect of child support enforcement on child support payments

  • Andrea H. Beller
  • John W. Graham
Article

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of state child support enforcement legislation on child support received from absent fathers by ever-married women due support in 1978 or 1981. The analysis is based upon data from the 1979 and 1982 March/April Match files of the Current Population Survey, two nationally-representative surveys of the eligible child support population, combined with a data set assembled by the authors on child support enforcement techniques available in each state. Based upon probit estimates and OLS estimates corrected for sample selection bias, we find that expedited processes and liens (against real and personal property), as well as wage withholding laws in effect for at least three years, increased the amount of child support received in 1981. In general, enforcement is more effective at increasing the amount received than the probability of receiving something, and is more effective for Blacks than for nonBlacks.

Keywords

Population Survey Personal Property Child Support Current Population Survey State Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Arnaudo, D. (1987). Office of Child Support Enforcement, Personal Conversation, April 6.Google Scholar
  2. Ashenfelter, O. and J. Heckman (1976). ‘Measuring the effect of an antidiscrimination program’, in O. Ashenfelter and J. Blum (eds.), Evaluating the Labor Market Effects of Social Programs. Industrial Relations Section, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University.Google Scholar
  3. Beller, A.H. (1979). ‘The impact of equal employment opportunity laws on the male/female earnings differential’, in C. Lloyd et al. (eds.), Women in the Labor Market. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Beller, A.H. and S.S. Chung (1988). ‘The effect of child support payments on the educational attainment of children.’ Paper presented at the Population Association of America meetings, New Orleans.Google Scholar
  5. and J.W. Graham (1985). ‘Variations in the economic well-being of divorced women and their children: The role of child support income’, in M. David and T. Smeeding (eds.), Horizontal Equity, Uncertainty and Economic Well-Being. Studies in Income and Wealth Series, Vol. 50. National Bureau of Economic Research, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  6. (1986a). ‘Child support awards: Differentials and trends by race and marital status’, Demography 23: 231–45.Google Scholar
  7. (1986b). ‘The determinants of child support income’, Social Science Quarterly 67: 353–64.Google Scholar
  8. Beron, K. (1988). ‘Applying the economic model of crime to child support enforcement: A theoretical and empirical analysis’, Review of Economics and Statistics 70: 382–90.Google Scholar
  9. Cassetty, J. (1978). Child Support and Public Policy. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath.Google Scholar
  10. Gordon, N.M., C.A. Jones, and I.V. Sawhill (1978). ‘The determinants of child support payments.’ Working Paper #992–05. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, June.Google Scholar
  11. Graham, J.W. and A.H. Beller(1989). ‘The effect of child support payments on the labor supply of female family heads: An econometric analysis’, Journal of Human Resources 24: 664–88.Google Scholar
  12. Heckman, J.J. (1979). ‘Sample selection bias as a specification error’, Econometrica 47: 153–61.Google Scholar
  13. Hill, M.S. (1984). ‘PSID analysis of matched pairs of ex-spouses: The relation of economic resources and new family obligations to child support payments.’ Report to the Department of Health and Human Services — ASPE.Google Scholar
  14. Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin (1987). ‘Child support assurance system: An update’, Focus 10: 16–18.Google Scholar
  15. Katz, S.N. (1983). ‘A historical perspective on child-support laws in the United States’, in J. Cassetty (ed.), The Parental Child-Support Obligation. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  16. Landes, W.M. (1968). ‘The economics of fair employment laws’,Journal of Political Economy 76: 507–52.Google Scholar
  17. National Conference of State Legislatures (1981). A Guide to State Child Support and Paternity Laws: In the Best Interest of the Child by C.R. Kastner and L.R. Young, October.Google Scholar
  18. Robins, P.K. (1986). ‘Child support, welfare dependency, and poverty’, American Economic Review 76: 768–88.Google Scholar
  19. Seltzer, J.A. (1991). ‘Legal custody arrangements and children's economic welfare’, American Journal of Sociology 96: 895–929.Google Scholar
  20. Sorensen, A. and M. MacDonald (1983). ‘An analysis of child-support transfers’, in J. Cassetty (ed.), The Parental Child-Support Obligation. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  21. U.S. Bureau of the Census (1980). Current Population Reports, P-23, No. 106, ‘Child support and alimony: 1978 (advance report)’, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  22. (1981). Current Population Reports, P-23, No. 112, ‘Child support and alimony: 1978’, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  23. (1985). Current Population Reports, P-23, No. 140, ‘Child support and alimony: 1981’, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  24. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Support Enforcement (1980). Child Support Enforcement Statistics: Fiscal 1979.Google Scholar
  25. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Child Support Enforcement (1984). Secretary's Symposium on Child Support Enforcement, Mimeo, August 16–17, 1984.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea H. Beller
    • 1
  • John W. Graham
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Human Resources and Family Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsRutgers UniversityNewarkUSA

Personalised recommendations