Genetica

, Volume 58, Issue 3, pp 161–175 | Cite as

Inversion polymorphism in Southeast Asian populations of the Drosophila nasuta subgroup

  • M. Clyde
Article

Abstract

Heterozygosity for chromosomal arrangements was investigated in four species of the nasuta complex. D. sulfurigaster albostrigata, D. albomicans and D. kohkoa are highly polymorphic whereas D. pulaua is monomorphic. Inversions were identified with the aid of photographic chromosome maps. The geographic distribution and frequencies of inversions detected and their possible phylogenies were discussed. Most inversions in D.s. albostrigata and D. albomicans occur on chromosome IIL. In D. kohkoa there is marked preponderance of inversions on chromosome III. Non-random association of certain inversions was noted. Variation in frequencies of inversions is interpreted as a result of adaptation to local ecogeographic conditions. Shared extant polymorphisms indicate phylogenetic relationships between species.

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Clyde
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of QueenslandSt. LuciaAustralia

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