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Genetica

, Volume 70, Issue 2, pp 119–151 | Cite as

New developments in vertebrate cytotaxonomy IX Chromosome numbers in the order Insectivora (Mammalia)

  • J. W. F. Reumer
  • A. Meylan
Article

Abstract

A reference list of chromosome numbers of about 110 species in the order insectivora is presented. Cytotaxonomic data are known for six families: Solenodontidae, Tenrecidae (incl. Potamogalidae), Erinaceidae, Soricidae, Talpidae and Macroscelididae (only the Chrysochloridae remain unstudied). The list provides, wherever possible, the diploid chromosome number(s), Nombre Fondamental, and references; sometimes information on geography, synonymy, as well as short comments are added.

Keywords

Chromosome Number Reference List Diploid Chromosome Number Short Comment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. F. Reumer
    • 1
  • A. Meylan
    • 2
  1. 1.Station de zoologic expérimentaleChêne-BougeriesSwitzerland
  2. 2.Station Fédérale de Recherches Agronomiques de ChanginsNyonSwitzerland

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