Boundary-Layer Meteorology

, Volume 78, Issue 3–4, pp 247–290

Air-sea fluxes: 25 years of progress

  • Stuart D. Smith
  • Christopher W. Fairall
  • Gerald L. Geernaert
  • Lutz Hasse
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00120938

Cite this article as:
Smith, S.D., Fairall, C.W., Geernaert, G.L. et al. Boundary-Layer Meteorol (1996) 78: 247. doi:10.1007/BF00120938

Abstract

During the past quarter century the study of air-sea interaction has evolved from a small branch of marine climatology to play a key role in the modelling of the coupled system of ocean and atmosphere. Knowledge of air- sea fluxes has grown, based on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for surface boundary layers and on direct and indirect techniques of measuring the fluxes. This has been the basis for providing boundary conditions needed to couple atmospheric and oceanic circulation models that are used to forecast weather and climate. An overview of current understanding is followed by a discussion of parameterisation schemes and a chronicle of some of the experimental work that has tested theories and quantified their conclusions.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart D. Smith
    • 1
  • Christopher W. Fairall
    • 2
  • Gerald L. Geernaert
    • 3
  • Lutz Hasse
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Fisheries and OceansBedford Institute of OceanographyDartmouthCanada
  2. 2.NOAA Environmental Technology LaboratoryBoulderUSA
  3. 3.Department of Emissions and Air PollutionNational Environmental Research InstituteRoskildeDenmark
  4. 4.Institut für Meereskunde, Universität KielKielGermany

Personalised recommendations