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Instructional Science

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 49–58 | Cite as

Depth of processing and the quality of learning outcomes

  • David Watkins
Article

Abstract

Problems associated with earlier research on the relationship between depth of processing and quality of learning outcomes are first discussed. Then I present an interview study with 60 second year tertiary students which supports the hypothesis that depth of processing is related to the quality of learning outcomes.

Keywords

Early Research Learning Outcome Interview Study Tertiary Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Watkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Office for Research in Academic MethodsAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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