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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 251–275 | Cite as

Agroforestry experimentation: Separating the wood from the trees?

  • Peter A. Huxley
Article

Abstract

ICRAF has evolved and evaluated experimental approaches to agroforestry problems which will help resercchers reach practical conclusions most cost-effectively in the shortest possible time, and with only limited resources. This has meant looking into the experimental phases needed, developing the conceptual background to research problems which involve the complex spatial/temporal features of agroforestry systems, suggesting and initiating simplified field experimental designs and/or assessment methodologies, and establishing source and reference design materials about agroforestry research for distribution.

These four sets of activities are outlined and briefly discussed in relation to some of the key research issues which have emerged.

Suitable methods for many areas of experimental agroforestry are rapidly being defined, although some of the more complex issues (e.g. multistrata systems, on-farm research with multipurpose trees and tree/crop mixtures) still need a focused attempt to develop appropriate research methodologies.

Key words

agroforestry research agroforestry experimentation agroforestry investigations field designs systematical designs geometric designs experimental assessment data analysis 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter A. Huxley

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